Garen Bedrossian Highlights

Garen Bedrossian Highlights

Online Exclusive Exhibition

Tufenkian Fine Arts is pleased to present, "Garen Bedorssian Highlights", an online exclusive exhibition feautring the artist's latest body of work.

Bedrossian is a figurative artist with an expressionist bend whose artworks explore man, or rather mankind. The main body of his current works consists of poetic images and sculptural situations where a person's uniqueness is challenged by his quest for identity or social belonging.

In his paintings, Bedrossian gives poetic significance to what is essentially an abstract structure. The deeply felt psychological statements permeating his creative production are Bedrossian's significant contribution to the domain of contemporary art.

To learn more about the pieces in the exhibition, visit our Artsy page!

JULIA COUZENS, RICHARD HOBLOCK, FARZAD KOHAN

JULIA COUZENS, RICHARD HOBLOCK, FARZAD KOHAN

CAROLE ANN KLONARIDES

It’s A New Day, with thanks to Nina Simone

By Carole Ann Klonarides

 

Reconsideration, repurposing, recalibration, call it what you like, for artists Julia Couzens, Richard Hoblock, and Farzad Kohan, it is an ongoing process. Layering, marking, moving the paint (the eye never rests), weaving, wrapping, scraping (the hand keeps active), a cyclical loop of rediscovery. An inspiration, perhaps, is to reconstruct a new consciousness from the salvage of our yesterdays. Sometimes the old is reinvented yet the roots remain, and new growth appears, and as cliched as it sounds, a new day begins. 

 

Birds flying high, you know how I feel
Sun in the sky, you know how I feel
Breeze driftin' on by, you know how I feel

 

For Richard Hoblock, it began with writing screenplays commissioned as portraits; each portrait was an imagined cinematic scene, the patron as the protagonist with underpinnings of personal details they provided. As a skilled writer, he could have several subplots at variance with each other all happening at once. After a series of screenplay portraits, he began to make abstract drawings while looking at Baroque paintings, focusing on a gesture or detail. Referring obtusely to the act of writing, his leftover pencil stubs would be ground down using a Cuisinart into a fine carbon powder which was used as a ground and drawn into. When finished, they were photographed using an 8 x 10 camera, a digital file is created, and the original drawing was then destroyed (unintentionally so was the Cuisinart!) Each photographic print was unique as part of his Baroque Series. This practice of layering materials and procedures, several times removed from the original, began a cycle of deconstruction and improvement, a reauthoring with each transitional stage. Yet, it was not quite an appropriation as the original source of inspiration is not apparent. It is more a process of cite and re-citing.

 

According to the artist, he started painting seriously after seeing the Willem deKooning painting Excavation at the Art Institute of Chicago. An obsession with the work inspired many revisits to view it. The painting has an intensive build-up of surface that has been scraped to reveal underlying layers of paint and gesture, hence the title of the work. Starting with a color or off-white ground of paint, Hoblock also would build up layers and then scrape the surface with a palette knife or kitchen utensils, leaving the residue of previous layers along the edges as a visage of the process. Not quite a revival of gestural abstract painting, Hoblock puts it, “I went from concrete as a language to abstract as a gesture.” With such a calligraphic gesture, perhaps a screenplay is hidden within. However, it is up to the viewer to project their own, as his is not revealed with the exception of an occasional hint hidden within the title. 

 

The most recent incarnations are vertically oriented abstract paintings that have dramatic virtuoso paint strokes of discordant colors. These seemingly would not go together but with his deft precision are found to abide on the same canvas. Fleshy pinks, cranberry reds with lipstick orange, and dull browns. Acid Green! White cutout shapes are held in front of the canvas to help the artist’s eye create the blank space needed to find the relationships within and around the gestures and forms—there can be no signature image as there is always contingency in the shifting relationships. The trajectory of this thought process finds a way for intuition to play; the outcome is not set. The work Champion was painted listening to the Miles Davis’ recording “Bitches Brew,” which similarly gives dead air and timing to punctuate each note creating a jarring, yet magnificent composition of discordant sounds. Replace sound with color and form and the same can be said about these gnomic paintings–what shouldn’t work comes together in a harmonious celebration of defiance. 

 

 

Blossom on the tree, you know how I feel
It's a new dawn
It's a new day
It's a new life for me

 

Farzad Kohan prides himself as a self-taught artist always in-flux. His signature process of building up bits of ripped paper collaged on board or canvas, then distressed by sanding the surface, exposes layers of the passage of time and history of application like the age rings of a fallen tree. Ghostly bits immerge; gestures of automatic drawing, cursive lines of Farsi or Persian, the edges of torn magazine pages come forward and recede, much like distant memories. Having left his family and country of Iran at the age of eighteen, escaping first to Pakistan, then migrating to Sweden and later, settling in California, he weaves all of his past into the layers that make up his paintings and drawings with gradual transformations that sometimes hide the stories or hint at untold truths. As an émigré, a desire to be part of something bigger than himself drew him to art making; his work is imbued with a desired sense of belonging and new beginnings. The use of repellent materials, such as oil and water, perhaps metaphorically reflect the difficulties of assimilation, and his labor intensive procedures, the process of migration.

 

Inspired by a homeless man who creatively repurposed found objects, Farzad found his own economy of artistic material by using everything in his studio and surroundings. He taught art to children and learned from them, made his own paper, repurposed regional maps, created drawings and then ripped them to shreds along with discarded magazines (most commonly the local Iranian magazine Javanan), and then adhered them with water and glue in layers. For an additional pièce de résistance, in which an occasional fragment of fabric would be woven. 

 

Lately, a series of works has turned more recognizably figurative. In each, he has firmly rooted a blossoming tree in a pot, with branches appearing to reach out of the confines of the perimeter of the rectangle. The arrangement of the carefully orientated strips of paper and the use of color is driven by form and texture. Slowly, he stopped sanding the surface, letting the paper bits layer like the bark of a tree. Underneath is evidence of the artist’s personal history, tangled lines that appear like the roots of many years of drawing automatically from the subconscious. As we walked out of his studio, he pointed to a cypress tree so tall it looked like it touched the sky. “See that, it was here the whole time and I never noticed it until recently.” I immediately thought of Van Gogh’s painting of cypress trees reaching to the sun and moon, with signature swirls and whorls in the heavy impasto. Van Gogh painted many trees, and in retrospect, the trees influenced by Japanese woodcuts are the ones that Farzad’s trees most resemble, with their minimal canopy and heavy outlines, a mastery mix of many historical and cultural influences. Not rooted in the ground but in a vessel, they are ready for transport to a new home.

 

 

Dragonfly out in the sun, you know what I mean, don't you know?
Butterflies all havin' fun, you know what I mean
Sleep in peace when day is done, that's what I mean
And this old world is a new world
And a bold world, for me

 

 

As she approached the Little Flower Café in Pasadena, Julia Couzens eyed and then scooped up a doggie toggle pull toy left behind, a tight bundle of many colored strings that actually resembled some of her own sculptures. “Oh, this is so perfect for what I am working on!”, she exclaimed to me as she quickly stuffed it into her bag, a catchall for similar urban detritus she finds as she walks about. Her sculptures, which she calls “bundles,” are obsessively wrapped asymmetrical masses of rope, wire, string, yarn, bungee cord, fabric, and plastic, that have a textural physicality that gives the expression “tightly wound” a whole new meaning. Gathering, twisting, weaving, sewing, tying, all make up the form. The resulting structure, in its solidity with an occasional sharp angle, seems architectural, but is actually derived from a long history of drawing from the model or nature. Each sculpture begins like a drawing, starting with a line and continues until the intuited end with an aim to visually and physically build up layer after layer of contained energy. Like the Japanese tsutsumi ("wrapping"), used as protection for precious temple objects, one wonders if something worth protecting is contained within the sculpture’s inner core, but the contents (if there are any) are safely secured and hidden. 

 

In making the bundles, process and materiality is something Couzens privileges over the conceptual. Whether conscious or not, her work counters the historical patriarchy of monumental sculpture. Sculptors Eva Hesse and Jackie Winsor, process and materials artists a generation before, offered a more organic approach in comparison to the minimal and conceptual work of Donald Judd and Robert Morris, whereas Couzens’ work is closer aligned to the work of Michelle Segre and Shinique Smith. Replacing the chisel with a needle, and casting with weaving,  each work has a sculptural monumentality that comes out of craft traditions. They are light of weight, and if I were to wax poetic, I could see them strapped on the body as one’s total belongings carried on a nomadic sojourn. The use of color is as a force, one different from contemporary sculpture primarily made of wood, stone, and metal, with a simultaneity of color combinations that express the ineffable.

 

Given a rotation of 360 degrees, each side of the sculpture provides a new vantage point with a new face. There is no totality or instant read, they operate in the space like alien forms whose origins one can’t quite define and are so self-contained that they seem natural on the floor, hung from the ceiling, or protruding from a wall. It is the bringing together of these repurposed and disparate materials tightly bound in all their brilliant splendor that sends off a charge like a bundle of electrical circuitry ready to combust. 

 

To paraphrase Couzens from a recent online response to our times, “Art’s nature is exploratory, peripheral to linear progress and predetermined order. I think its meaning sprouts from the cracks in life.”  A bundle titled, Sweet, has a long shoot of bright green yarn that escaped and at its end is hanging a smaller bundle as if to say from the entanglements we make, there is always the possibility of something new thriving from the mess. 


It’s a new dawn

It's a new day
It's a new life for me
And I'm feeling good

SIGRID BURTON ONLINE CATALOG

SIGRID BURTON

SIGRID BURTON

SIGRID BURTON

OPENING RECEPTION

THURSDAY MARCH 12, 2020 from 6 - 8 PM

"My process is accretive and dependent on multiple layers of both color and drawing.   Color, a crucial component, creates atmosphere and elicits not only an emotional, but also a physiological response.  For me, color is sui generis; it communicates in its own unique language.  My drawing and mark making refer to and derive from the natural world, botanical and biological anatomies, including marine life, the structures of both macro and micro cosmologies and writing systems, such as logograms.  My sources include collected objects, ephemera, photographic resources, and constellation diagrams, as well as, the direct observation of natural phenomena, including landscape, astronomy, and weather.  The specific content is intended to be ambiguous, yet evocative, referencing light and spatial phenomena, a common language of forms, and a shared cross-cultural use of symbols."

Sigrid Burton

GALLERY TALK: VAHE BERBERIAN

GALLERY TALK: VAHE BERBERIAN

in conversation with Annaly Bennett

SEPTEMBER 28, 2 - 4 PM

Familiarizing oneself with how and why Berberian’s creative output represents his immersion in all of his media of choice - whether acting, writing, music or visual art - is to witness and experience not only a body of work but a body of life.  One is reminded of Jackson Pollock’s declarative words: “I don’t paint nature. I am nature.”

ART ASPEN

ART ASPEN

JULY 25 - 28, 2019

Aspen Ice Garden, Booth # A5, 233 W Hyman Ave Aspen, CO 81611

Art Aspen

Booth # A5
Aspen Ice Garden
233 W Hyman Ave
Aspen, CO 81611

SIGRID BURTON

SIGRID BURTON

RANNEY AWARD

Sigrid Burton is an artist known for her paintings and mixed media works on paper, and, in particular, for her use of color. 

Since the mid-1970s, Sigrid’s work has been exhibited nationally and internationally. In 1977 she received the Richard and Hilda Rosenthal Foundation Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, given to a young artist of distinction who has not yet had due recognition. Her works are included in numerous public and corporate collections, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

RUBEN AMIRIAN

RUBEN AMIRIAN

SELECTED WORKS

JUNE 6 - JULY 12, 2019

GARO ANTREASIAN

GARO ANTREASIAN

DOCUMENTARY FILM: GARO Z. ANTREASIAN: ARTIST

PRODUCED BY TIM TICEHURST AND MARK AZNAVOURIAN

CLICK ON THE LINK BELOW TO WATCH

GARO Z. ANTREASIAN: ARTIST.

SETA MANOUKIAN

SETA MANOUKIAN

DOCUMENTARY FILM: MOTHER SELA ARTIST AND BUDDHIST

PRODUCED BY DARSALIA AND 3 POINT LANDING PRODUCTION

CLICK ON LINK BELOW TO WATCH:

 

ANTHONY ASKEW

ANTHONY ASKEW

GLENDALE NEWS PRESS

April 2, 2019

Glendale Native's Work on Display at Tukenkian Fine Arts by Mark Kellam

SETA MANOUKIAN

SETA MANOUKIAN

BOOK RELEASE

The Sursock Museum in Lebanon recently launched Seta Manoukian's book “Seta Manoukian: Painting in Levitation,” co-published by Kaph Books. 
 

Seta Manoukian’s “The North Wind or Composition” (1982) is currently on display as part of “Ten Stories from the Sursock Museum Collection.” Seta’s early drawings reveal a sense of composition, a strong artistic hand, and an original talent. She was teaching at the Lebanese University when the Civil War broke out in 1975. After ten years of war in Lebanon, she fled to Los Angeles, California, where she still lives today as a Buddhist nun.  

 
Seta Manoukian: Painting in Levitation is available for purchase at Tufenkian Fine Arts.

 
GALLERY TALK: FARZAD KOHAN

GALLERY TALK: FARZAD KOHAN

In conversation with Nathalie Tierce

Join us Sunday, April 7th, 1:00 to 3:00 to hear more about Farzad Kohan's process and his new series, The Story of US.

TONY ASKEW: Looking Forward / Looking Back

TONY ASKEW: Looking Forward / Looking Back

RECEPTION FRIDAY MARCH 15, 2019, 7-9:30 PM

MARCH 15 - APRIL 12, 2019

Tufenkian Fine Arts is honored to present the work of Tony Askew.  An opening reception will take place on Friday March 15, 2019 from 7 to 9:30 pm.

Askew received his BA in Fine Art and Sociology from UCSB in 1962, as well as his MA in Printmaking at California State College, LA in 1971. He began teaching art at various high schools in Southern California before he began his 25-year career at Westmont College in Santa Barbara, CA. Askew retired in 2008 after establishing Westmont's printmaking program and founding the Reynolds Gallery, now known as the Westmont Ridley-Tree Museum of Art. Throughout this time, he exhibited works at a number of galleries, including Delphine Gallery, Cabrillo Arts Center, Montecito Frame & Gallery, and the Print Arts Northwest Gallery in Portland, OR.

FARZAD KOHAN: Stories of US

FARZAD KOHAN: Stories of US

RECEPTION FRIDAY MARCH 15, 2019, 7-9:30 PM

MARCH 15 - APRIL 12, 2019

Tufenkian Fine Arts is honored to present in the TFA Project Space a new body of work by Farzad Kohan, Stories of US

"Farzad affirms in the series Stories of US that 'all of US being the same yet different' to be 'a record of our everyday life in a way, making connections, making relationships and how we interact with each other, basically life as a form.' These small groups of borderless paintings, painted on circular wooden panels of two to three different sizes are an inspired attempt to create meaning that furthers his ideas and ideals to engender meaning.

These sublime spheres, perfectly floating before US, in pastels or deeply colored, are marked by a leathery patina; one that seems to have been observed in a distant planet or moon seen from earth, its hues vibrant and monochromatic, all different yet bound by similarities in size and texture, stationed in static caveats." 

Excepted from the essay Everyday...In the Absense of Words on the work of Farzad Kohan by Shaheen Merali, 2019.

GALLERY TALK: JOANNE JULIAN

GALLERY TALK: JOANNE JULIAN

in conversation with BETTY ANN BROWN

SUNDAY MARCH 3, 2019 from 3 to 5 pm

Joanne Julian, multi-media artist and faculty member at College of the Canyons in Valencia, CA, will discuss her art pratice with art historian, critic and author Betty Ann Brown in the gallery.

GALLERY TALK: TERMEH YEGHIAZARIAN

GALLERY TALK: TERMEH YEGHIAZARIAN

In conversation with ANNALY BENNETT

SUNDAY JANUARY 27, 2019 from 3 to 5 PM

Termeh Yeghiazarian is a multidisciplinary artist exploring the intersections of politics, socio-economy, identity and cultural representation.  Her recent work is focused on concepts of home and belonging in the aftermath of displacement.

TERMEH YEGHIAZARIAN

TERMEH YEGHIAZARIAN

RECEPTION THURSDAY JANUARY 10, 2019, 7-9:30 PM

JANUARY 10 - 31, 2019

Tufenkian Fine Arts is honored to present: Termeh Yeghiazarian: be.longings. 

This exhibition of new works will kick off with an opening reception Thursday, January 10, 2019 from  7:00 - 9:30 pm and will remain open through Thursday January 31, 2019.

JULIE MARKFIELD

JULIE MARKFIELD

RECEPTION THURSDAY JANUARY 10, 2019, 7-9:30 PM

JANUARY 10 - 31, 2019

Tufenkian Fine Arts is honored to present: Julie Markfield: Awakening & Remembering. 

This exhibition of new works will kick off with an opening reception Thursday, January 10, 2019 from  7:00 - 9:30 pm and will remain open through Thursday January 31, 2019.

 

HOLIDAY GROUP SHOW

HOLIDAY GROUP SHOW

November 29, 2018 - December 21, 2018

Tufenkian Fine Arts is honored to present this group show representing the artists we have exhibited over the past year, including Ruben Amiriam, Garo Z. Antreasian, Carlos Beltran, Vahe Berberian, Fatemah Burnes, Sigrid Burton, Andre B. Carter, Sam Grigorian, Hagop Hagopian, Diana Hakopyan, Diane Holland, Hamlet Hovsepian, Gegam Kacherian, Haig Kargayan, Farzad Kohan, Seta Manoukian, Yevgine Martirosyan, Alina Mnatsakanian, Nano Rubio, Arthur Sarkissian, Vachag, Aram Vartanov, Sergio Wilton, Mamigon Yengibarian and Torie Zalben.

GEGAM KACHERIAN

GEGAM KACHERIAN

REFRACTIONS BY KIREILYN BARBER

10/3/2018

“Refractions” presents a new body of work in the dedicated practice of painting for artist Gegam Kacherian. The series is both a continuation of the artist’s interest in subject matter and ruminations on existence and feeling, and a departure, visible in his investigations of media, the painting process and how meaning can be constructed and interpreted.

The new direction for the work had its inception at the Kaus Australis residency in Rotterdam, Holland, organized by curator and artist Carl Berg; an exchange exhibition between Dutch and US artists had also been planned. The James Turrell piece “Celestial Vault” is an earthwork on view in Den Haag, and was a focal point of the 2014 summer residency that Kacherian participated in. Situated near the dunes and edge of the North Sea, the Turrell work became a destination for the residency’s artists that summer.

SETA MANOUKIAN

SETA MANOUKIAN

The Canvas Speaks in Silence by Nare Garibyan Yerevan Magazine- July-August, 2011

04/02/2018

CONVERSATIONS: A FOCUS ON CONTEMPORARY LATIN AMERICAN ART

CONVERSATIONS: A FOCUS ON CONTEMPORARY LATIN AMERICAN ART

Walkthrough

The Tufenkian Fine Arts Gallery is pleased to announce the Artists’ Walkthrough to close the exhibition “Conversations.”

This show features recent works by artists Nano Rubio, Sergio Witron and Carlos Beltran Arechiga. Included in the exhibition will be new works that delve further into the aesthetics and ideas exploring the contemporary state of painting in Los Angeles and the cultural contributions offered by Latino artists in southern California. 

GARO ANTREASIAN

GARO ANTREASIAN

Representation of legendary artist Garo Antreasian

Tufenkian Fine Arts is pleased to announce its representation of Albuquerque-based artist Garo Antreasian.

A distinguished painter and draftsman, Antreasian is also a pioneering lithographer, highly respected and renowned in the printmaking world. His contributions to American art have been well-documented and place him alongside the great innovators of mid-20th-century American art. 
 

 

 

SAM GRIGORIAN

SAM GRIGORIAN

SAM GRIGORIAN: COLORATION Exclusive Online Exhibition on Artsy

5/12/2017

ARTHUR SARKISSIAN

ARTHUR SARKISSIAN

ARTHUR SARKISSIAN; LA SERIES Exclusive Online Exhibition on Artsy

05/12/2017

SERJ TANKIAN

SERJ TANKIAN

Los Angeles Times, Nov. 6, 2016 - System of a Down's Serj Tankian goes classical with symphonic concerts in Northridge, by Jessica Gelt

SAM GRIGORIAN

SAM GRIGORIAN

Fabrik - The Intersection of Art, Design & Architecture // Issue 30 - Sam Grigorian: West Coast Premier - Review by Peter Frank